Amber Waves of Grain

Road trips are one of our favorite things to enjoy. And with a bead on dog-friendly hotels (thank you Best Western Plus, we love your rewards program), Willa gets to come along, too.

Last week we attended the Arlington Fly-In in Washington state. The scenery in the Pacific Northwest is spectacular with soldier-straight rows of grapes vines in mile after mile of vineyards, vast fields of pole-climbing hops, the heavenly scent of apple trees as far as the eye can see, farm stands bursting with freshly picked bing cherries, and oceans of golden wheat gently blowing in the breeze.

It’s enough to make you burst into song. And we did—America the Beautiful!

When was the last time you spontaneously burst into song?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

The Space Between

It’s the space between words on a page that make reading enjoyable. It’s the space between notes in a musical score that makes listening pleasurable.

Hint #3 — Globally there are eight species of pelicans. Only two of the eight species live in North America. During my sabbatical, I won’t see any because they’re wintering in states south of my geographic location. If it were summertime, however, I might be gifted with a sighting.

Life has spaces.

Some are shorter than others—the space between breaths, blinking, and heartbeats.

Some are longer than others—the space between cell phone upgrades, careers, and changing homes.

Life happens in the space between. And it’s meant to be savored.

Do you give yourself enough space?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Looking for Laurie

Somewhat like “Where’s Waldo?” I’m currently in hiding. Well, not hiding exactly, but on a three month sabbatical to finish writing my next book—The Business of Being.

I’ll be in this U.S. location—where I don’t know anyone, and no one knows me—until the last week of March. Social media visits will be rare as I plan to laser-focus on completing the manuscript. However, I’ve reserved Tuesdays to come up for air and visit with online friends here and on your blogs as well.

Hint #1 — I'm not in Palm Springs.

Hint #1 — I’m not in Palm Springs.

The latitude of my hideaway is 46.021587. Hang onto it because my final post from this location (Mar 28) will contain the longitude. Each post between now and then will include a different hint in the photo caption. The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.

Sometimes people say, “I’m going away to find myself.” I know exactly where I am, but do you?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Easy Rider

My recent travels took me through four airports: Boise, Portland, Chicago, and Seattle. It provided the opportunity to see baggage of every size, shape, and color—some carried, most of it pulled.

An enthusiastic proponent of offloading [emotional] baggage, I had to laugh at the ingenuity of the young traveler I captured in this photo. Rather than carrying baggage and letting it weigh him down, he got a ride on it!

Have you discovered the joy of offloading baggage?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Water Under the Bridge

Recently we enjoyed an overnight trip to Twin Falls, Idaho, home to three waterfalls:

  • Shoshone Falls — known as “Niagara Falls of the West”
  • Pillar Falls — 1.5 miles upstream from Perrine Bridge pictured below
  • Twin Falls — the city’s namesake

Twin Falls became the center of national attention in September 1974 when daredevil Evel Knievel attempted to jump the Snake River Canyon in a specially modified rocket cycle—a perfect segue for “water under the bridge;” an idiom cliche used to refer to something that’s over, done, and not given much thought.

A similar phrase “much water has passed under the bridge since…” works equally well. Forty-two years have passed since Evel’s failed attempt, and trillions of gallons of water have flowed under the Perrine Bridge.

How much water has passed under your bridge?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

 

A Pocketful of Pigeons

Heeding travel guru Rick Steves’ advice regarding Venice, Italy: “Don’t plan anything, just go with the flow and get lost!” we set out to do just that. And no matter where we went—the highly populated squares and piazzas, or the paths less traveled—we encountered pigeons.

A quick internet search reveals that “Pigeons once rivaled cats as the traditional, if unofficial, mascots of Venice.” Further, I learned that many people around the globe believe that to be hit by a “bird bomb” is a sign that good luck is just around the corner; it’s even in the 2003 movie Under the Tuscan Sun.

What you can’t see in the photo below is the agitation on the face of the proprietor of an off-the-beaten path outdoor restaurant that’s frequented by locals—families on a Sunday afternoon.

Note: the child in the background is not about to be airlifted by a giant pigeon. It’s somewhat of an optical illusion in that the pigeon is only about 8-feet from me, while the child is about 25-yards in the distance.

As a young couple left their table, pigeons descended en masse to snatch the left-behind crumbs; their fluttering wings tipping the wine glasses precariously. The proprietor rushed out, flapping his hands to shoo them away before any glasses crashed to the ground and broke.

What was the last thing that exasperated you?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Levels of Difficulty

Last week we talked about decisions, decisions, decisions. This week we’re looking at potential difficulty levels of that process. Decision-making involves choosing between two or more possible options/solutions. We can make it easy, or hard—the choice is ours.

The Karavolades stairs on Santorini, Greece — 588 steps that lead from base-to-top on the cliff side.

The Karavolades stairs on Santorini, Greece — 588 steps that lead from base-to-top on the cliff side. (click on photo to enlarge)

On the island of Santorini, Greece you’ll find the old Karavolades stairs—588 steps that lead from base-to-top on the cliff side. To get from point A to point B there are three levels of difficulty to choose from:

  • The easy route is to take the tram.
  • The tolerable (odiferous) route is to ride a donkey.
  • The difficult (stinky and slippery) route is to walk.

Have you ever made things more difficult than necessary?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com