Let there be Light – Not Heat

There are five windows in my writing studio: three of them face east (for the most part), and two of them face north. 

The east-facing windows used to let in heat—a lot of it! That is, until Len installed a translucent film designed to let in light, but not heat. We left the north-facing windows alone as lush trees shade them, and they provide an inspirational view.

There are many things we want/need, but not too much of. The first thing that comes to mind is food. We need it to stay alive and most of us enjoy it. I, for one, consider myself a “foodie.” But too much of it—without exercise—and we gain weight.

What is it that you want/need, but Goldilocks style—in just the right amount?

© lauriebuchanan.com

Any Way the Wind Blows

Depending on the route, I pass this beautiful weathervane a few times a week on my daily walks. Without fail, it brings to mind the saying: “Any way the wind blows.” 

To my way of thinking, that means to be easily persuaded, not to stand firm.

Similar, many people “go with the flow.” In my first book, Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth, I wrote: “Don’t go with the flow or against it. Create your own.” 

A friend of mine took a stand to not go with the flow, not go with the wind. She opted not to gather with a group of friends (many of them at risk) because of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Will there be friendship fallout from this stand? That’s yet to be seen. I respect that she stood firm in her convictions.

Do you go with the flow, any way the wind blows—or do you stand firm?

© lauriebuchanan.com

Gazing Balls

Gazing balls originated in Venice, Italy, in the 13th century, where the famous Italian glass blowers would blow glass of all sizes and colors. Most of these gazing balls were created for the affluent homes of kings and queens. 

Because gazing balls were thought to attract fairies and magical beings, King Ludwig II of Bavaria insisted that gazing balls be hung from trees, floated on the surrounding ponds, and placed on stands in the garden. Considered wildly eccentric, he longed to rule over a fairytale kingdom and built fairytale castles that today rate among Germany’s leading tourist attractions..

Gazing balls were also used to spy on couples as they walked around the garden (you could watch them unseen). They were also used in dining rooms of wealthy homes, so the maids and butlers could watch unobserved to see who needed their tea refilled.

Do you have a gazing ball in your home, yard, or garden?

© lauriebuchanan.com

Watershed Moment

The original usage of the word “watershed” describes a ridge of land separating waters that then flow into two different bodies.

A “watershed moment” is a turning point, the exact moment that changes the direction of an activity or situation, a dividing point from which things will never be the same. It’s considered momentous, though a watershed moment is often recognized in hindsight.

I’m not ready just yet to share my watershed moment, but I recently experienced one. It was momentous and didn’t occur in hindsight.

When was your most recent watershed moment?

© lauriebuchanan.com

Favorite Season

Though it’s been getting downright chilly in Boise, Idaho—with a dusting of snow flurries here and there—winter in the United States officially begins with the Winter Solstice (also known as Yule, or the Longest Night) on Saturday, December 21, 2019.

I took this photo in Garden Valley, Idaho, this past summer, when we were camping at their lovely fly-in airport campground. They start getting ready for winter early, and for a good reason, their elevation is much higher than ours, so they get snow—in earnest—early!

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Regardless of your geographic location (I realize many of you are entering summer-type weather right now), what is your favorite season?

© lauriebuchanan.com

Pick Me Up

Living in a historic district, we get to walk past grand old mansions and quaint cottages regularly. One of my favorites has a hay bale hauler near the peak of its roof.

Hay bale hauler

In the family stories passed down to my sister and me, we’ve heard that one time, our maternal grandfather’s wedding ring got caught on part of a hay bale hauler, and he hung there until they could “reel him in.” Not an ideal pick-me-up.

Laughter, especially that of my granddaughter, instantly picks me up, lifts my spirit. 

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What lifts your spirit?

© lauriebuchanan.com

YOU-nique

There’s not another person in the entire world who’s exactly like you. 

Law enforcement agencies and certain governmental departments use FINGERPRINTS to identify people. That’s because no two people in the world have the same prints. 

Scientists in Japan have discovered that our LIPS are distinctive too. Just like fingerprints, lips have little markings on them, tiny grooves in the skin, and each person has a different pattern.

No two people have the same SMELL. Police and other tracking dogs can follow a person’s scent—without getting mixed up—just by the smell (scent trail) a person leaves behind.

EYES, too, are used for identification. Just like fingerprints, every eye in the world is different. 

Our TEETH are different as well. That’s why our dental records can be used for identification.

My favorite thing about me? My earlobes. Definitely my earlobes!

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What’s your favorite thing about you?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Open Sesame

I love to travel, and when I do, I enjoy photographing the variety of doors I happen upon. A door is like a book—you don’t know what lies within until you open it. Something pleasant? Something scary? An adventure? Something that lulls you to sleep?

Left—Nova Scotia. Upper right—the Highlands of Scotland. Bottom right—Quebec.

Remember the story of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves? All Baba used the magical phrase — Open Sesame — to open the mouth of a cave in which forty thieves had hidden a treasure.

Santorini, Greece

And while there have been times I’ve not felt welcome, I’ve never had a door not open to me—regardless of my age, gender, skin color, politics, or spiritual tradition. I’m aware that’s sadly not the case for everyone. 

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Have you ever had a door not open to you, or shut in your face?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Hangry

I know a few people who appear to have jagged edges. They’re grouchy. Curmudgeonly. On occasion, I’ve even heard them “bark” — snap at others. Myself included.

When I get “hangry” (irritable or angry as a result of hunger), I get peevish. Once the hunger beast is satisfied, I bounce right back to my merry self. 

Let me be the first to say that while that might explain it, it doesn’t excuse it. Barking at others isn’t acceptable — even if the bark is worse than the bite.

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What brings out the worst in you?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Feng Shui

Feng Shui is the art of harmonious living. It involves the intentional placement of items to direct the circulation and flow of energy in a space. The desired outcome is unique by individual. For instance,  some people want to create balance and harmony, while others wish to boost their productivity, attract wealth, heighten creativity, advance their career, enhance good luck, and so on.

According to Feng Shui principles, the broom symbolizes insight and wisdom and is believed to have the power to sweep away negative energy, worry, and trouble. This ancient Chinese art counsels that the broom be hung by the door, symbolically sweeping out energy that no longer serves us well, making room for positive energy, abundance, and prosperity.

At our home, we use our brooms daily; they aren’t just for looks. They also serve as a visible reminder of our intent to maintain a positive, respectful, and healthy emotional environment in our space. 

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Do you incorporate any Feng Shui principles in your home?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com