Going the Distance

To get to a large grocery store, a gas station with un-inflated prices, or to pick up a pizza (not from a cafe that incidentally offers pizza), I drive 17 miles to a neighboring town. It boasts a population of 4,348—six times the size of the undisclosed location where I’m enjoying my sabbatical. The drive is gorgeous!

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Hint #11 — Lewis and Clark most likely saw this view when they were blazing a trail through this neck of the woods.

When I arrived with an already-started manuscript, I calculated how many words I’d need to write each day to go the distance; to complete it in three months. It requires 1,000 words per day, not counting Tuesdays, or two short visits from Len when we goof off the entire time.

For many people, writing 1,000 words per day is child’s play. Not for me. Even in a near-hermit existence with solitude as my companion, 1,000 words per day—that aren’t gobbledegook—is quite an undertaking, but I’m going the distance.

What is your most recent “going the distance” experience?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Logging and Writing

Not exclusive to screenplays, many writers create loglines to succinctly answer the question, “What’s your screenplay about?” or “Tell me a little bit about your book.”

Similar to an “elevator pitch,” a logline is a one or two sentence description of the story you want to convey to your audience or readers. For example, here’s the logline for the movie, Titanic:

A young man and woman from different social classes fall in love aboard an ill-fated voyage at sea.

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Hint #10 — Logging is a BIG deal in my undisclosed sabbatical location. In fact, it’s celebrated here!

I’m currently working on the logline for my next book, The Business of Being. Subject to change, here’s what I’ve got so far:

This book isn’t about being in business; it’s about the business of being. Spotlighting the intersection of corporate core values and personal virtues, The Business of Being helps you thrive in business and life.

If your life were a book, what would the logline be?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Murder Mystery

I enjoy writing nonfiction, but I also have fun writing fiction. I currently have a murder mystery simmering on the back burner that I’ll jump back into—with gusto!—once The Business of Being is complete.

The game of Clue offers several options as murder weapons—wrench, rope, candlestick, revolver, lead pipe, and knife.

Hint #7 — A portion of the state where I’m enjoying my sabbatical is considered a paradise for geologists.

Now that I’ve been in my sabbatical location for a while, and my mind’s had ample opportunity to wander, I think death by icicle would make a good way in a murder mystery to eliminate someone (picture me rubbing my hands together with a diabolical glint in my eyes). Unlike a knife used to stab someone, once a spike of ice has melted, there’d be no murder weapon as evidence.

Who is your favorite mystery writer?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Our Words Matter

words, Words, WORDS—I’m up to my neck in words as I craft my next book—The Business of Being. And I’m thoroughly enjoying every minute of it!

During the day I write them. Throughout the evening I read them. I’ve devoured six books since I’ve been here.

A week before I left for my three-month sabbatical, I had the privilege of speaking with a small group of entrepreneurial millennials. One of the topics we discussed was how our words matter.

Hint # 6 — The town where I’m enjoying my sabbatical is one of the few towns in the continental United States that boasts only one—count em, ONE!—drive-thru coffee shop.

My friend Dawn said, “Our words create our world.” That’s one of the reasons I suggest that my clients voice what they want and refrain from stating what they don’t want.

For example, instead of making statements like “don’t slam the door,” “don’t forget your lunch,” and “don’t talk to me like that,” state your desired outcome instead—say what you want. “Shut the door quietly, please.” Remember your lunch.” Speak to me with respect.”

Do you say what you want instead of what you don’t want?

“We die. That may be the meaning of life. But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives.“ —Toni Morrison, American novelist, editor, and professor

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Looking for Laurie

Somewhat like “Where’s Waldo?” I’m currently in hiding. Well, not hiding exactly, but on a three month sabbatical to finish writing my next book—The Business of Being.

I’ll be in this U.S. location—where I don’t know anyone, and no one knows me—until the last week of March. Social media visits will be rare as I plan to laser-focus on completing the manuscript. However, I’ve reserved Tuesdays to come up for air and visit with online friends here and on your blogs as well.

Hint #1 — I'm not in Palm Springs.

Hint #1 — I’m not in Palm Springs.

The latitude of my hideaway is 46.021587. Hang onto it because my final post from this location (Mar 28) will contain the longitude. Each post between now and then will include a different hint in the photo caption. The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.

Sometimes people say, “I’m going away to find myself.” I know exactly where I am, but do you?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

The Way I Roll

I recently received an email from someone telling me how lucky I am that “everything” I submit gets published. Quick to clear that misconception, I responded that for every article or essay of mine that gets accepted, I receive at least a dozen rejections. Here’s a photo of the most recent:

In an email conversation with my cousin, he made an observation that made me smile. He said, “It’s funny how the harder we work, the luckier we get.” 

I could easily pack up my marbles and go home at rejection. Or I can pick myself up, dust myself off, and start all over again—that’s the way I roll.

How do you respond to rejection?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Where There’s a Will…

The door on our carriage house is more slender than most. The couch that we purchased is larger than most.

We brought it in through the window. Voilà!

I’ve been told that getting one’s book into airport bookstores is near impossible. Gauntlet thrown. Line drawn in the sand.

We’ll see about that…

What’s your most recent “where there’s a will, there’s a way” experience?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com