Lifelong Learning

It’s not every day you see a hundred pairs of knee-high wading boots lined up at the ready. But it’s Salmon and Steelhead Days in Boise. A time to celebrate the biology, history, economic, and cultural significance of salmon and steelhead.

During this three day event, the Morrison Knudsen Nature Center hosts 80 classes of 5th graders from 34 schools around the Treasure Valley. 

“Kids in the Creek,” is but one of six stations the kids engage in during the event. At this station, they learn about aquatic insects and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

As both a student and teacher at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, I feel it’s essential to always be learning something new.

What are you actively learning about? Click To Tweet

What are you actively learning about?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

64 thoughts on “Lifelong Learning

  1. Oh, Laurie–sometimes I feel like that pair of boots in the second row–totally collapsed! Keeping up with the new computer systems at work is a challenge. I’m doing it, and I love learning how it is making my job easier….so they say. But sometimes I just want to stop and exhale. OK, now….where were we…. 🙂

  2. As a citizen conservationist, I love hearing about events like the one you are sharing here. The boots picture is so cool, especially when I think of all the young.feet which will inhabit them.

    Lifelong Learner. Yes, yes, yes. I am sure this is a central dimension of my way of being.
    Currently, I am learning how to self-edit my writing and use a related software. I’m also trying to hone my skills related to usng tools like Web-Ex and Zoom for online coaching and meetings I’m anxious about activating a new phone on my own for the first time; definitely my learning edge (probably much simpler than I imagine). This month I am making emergency soy candles from soy wax pellets.

    Tonight, our refuge has a bird walk prior to our meeting. There is so much to learn about birds! I will spare you any more examples.

    • Craig — And it’s taking place just down the street from us, so it’s fun to be able to watch bits of pieces of it happening as we take our walks on the Greenbelt throughout the day. 🙂

  3. Hmmm. This takes me by surprise and I’m a little disappointed in my answer. At the moment, I’m not actively learning, even though I have a few things lined up that i want to learn: Tapes to learn Spanish, books to learn how to use my camera better and how to play the ukelele, etc. I guess my brain is on coffee break. 😀

    • Patricia — It sounds like what you have lined up to learn (Spanish, a new camera, the ukelele) is going to keep you hopping, so now’s a good time to catch your breath before you jump into the fray with both feet 🙂

      • Thanks, Laurie. My husband and I sang with the Berkshire Choral International in Prague last month. What an experience to sing with 163 other choristers from 7 countries accompanied by an 80 member orchestra with 4 soloists and our Maestro Heinz Ferlesch from Vienna. Singing in the same palace in which Dvorak performed his Stabat Mater was awesome. We sang that piece in Latin. And the journey continues!

  4. How timely! I’ve just begun an extensive training in what is commonly called EMDR, a relatively new therapy technique for dealing with trauma and I’m quite captivated by its possibilities. AND, I’m finding I’m resistant to taking in anything else truly new at the moment, so much so I withdrew from a long anticipated singing workshop this past weekend.

    I too have participated as a presenter at various Osher Lecture Series here locally; what a fantastic offering it is. I hadn’t appreciated before how widespread it is. Thanks for that too.

    • Janet — And while I’ve heard and read about EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), I’ve never seen it done in person. I’m so glad to hear that you’re impressed with the possibilities!

      And yes, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is sprinkled throughout the United States at various colleges and universities. They have amazing offerings. 🙂

  5. I am always learning especially all of the new technology to keep up with my kids & grandkids. The grandkids just seem to know how to work a program on the computer without instructions. Amazing and exciting. Laurie your grandchild will be doing that very soon.

      • I loved using Lyft in San Francisco on my recent visit and not having to drive that busy city. Good to learn about all these ideas and opportunities!

  6. I too, have presented classes for Osher Lifelong Learning here in Minnesota; although I have yet to become a member.. I consider myself a Lifelong Learner as well. Despite my expertise at procrastination, I do enjoy the challenge of brain games, learning new skills, meeting new friends, getting outdoors (especially with grandchildren) and volunteering.

    • Cathy — You made me laugh out loud with your comment, “Despite my expertise at procrastination…”

      I liked reading the list of challenges you enjoy. Yes, indeed, those will definitely keep your brain well exercised.

  7. Hi Laurie! I am learning to go with the flow (because the flow knows where it’s going)! Oh, and my continuing journey of practicing gratitude every day! Thank you for a lovely post! I think it’s fantastic that the kiddos are learning about the aquatic insects and aquatic ecosystems! Cher xo

  8. Years ago, I learned to blog at an OLLI event. Never did I imagine that lately I would be learning about Mobi and E-Pub files as i publish the e-book version of my memoir. Mind-bending, indeed!

    Great question, Laurie!

  9. I’m trying to learn how to paint with water colors, which I haven’t used for probably half a century. Whooo, that sounds like so long ago! Also the continuing challenge of loosening up when I paint.

  10. I am sure I learn at least one new thing a day! Computer programs are constantly changing and I am learning new ways to market my books. LIfe is all about learning!

  11. What not!!!

    Water, nutrients, soils, people, politics, shearwaters, dotterels, AI, security protocols, xBase programming with SSL protocols and PostGRE SQL, golf, landslides, earthquakes, law, governance, natural justice and jurisprudence, policy development and planning contexts, mathematics of Lie Groups, their algebras and abstract topologies, sensemaking, thermal imaging, cancer and removal strategies (aspects of each of these {and many more} within the last week).

    Then my brain goes into internal overdrive correlating them all, and finding useful linkages and insights (none of which I can communicate effectively).

      • Many think I have Laurie 😉

        Often there is so little commonality between how reality presents itself to me, and how it occurs to others, that very little of interest to me may be communicated in detail. I have to use very simple models of things that are not at all simple, and that always has high risk with it.

        All I can do is try, to the best of my limited abilities.

  12. Laurie, this has been a somewhat harrowing year for me, one of rapid fire decisions with long term consequences, many of which may never even appear in my lifetime. I believe I may have made it over the hump now. I lived through it all and now I need to be creative again to pull some of that Energy out of the Universe and see what I can make of it. Maybe make some of my gratitude physical and pleasant to view. I am learning how to smile and laugh again. I’m good for now.

  13. I definitely agree, Laurie. I have more interests than I can always actively pursue, but I cycle through different opportunities as I can. I’m very involved in several science and nature centers taking informal (non-credit) courses and various library offerings available in art and music. For me, as much as it is important to keep my mind active and to continue feeding my curiosity, I really enjoy being with others who share my interests and in these learning centers and environments I find the companionship of others sometimes more positively challenging than my long-term friendships where we have history, but dialogue sometimes stalls. It’s a nice way to enrich my mind and my social circles. 🙂

    • Debra — I loved reading the list of interests and activities that enrich your mind. And you’re right about broadening/enhancing our social circles — it’s a perfect way to engage with something “different from the norm.”

  14. Right now I am preparing for four speaking engagements before Oct. 23. Not much room for anything else! But each time I speak, I learn as much as possible about the topic. Writing to Change the World; Swaying in Wicked Grace: An Evening of Poetry, Wine, and Inspiration for Women; Three Sides of the Coin of Fundraising, and worship leading in my church. That’s a little more than I usually bite off in a month, so I am pulling on my boots!

    • Shirley — I love the topics you’ve listed. Oh, how I would love to be attendance (or even just a fly on the wall). I wish we didn’t live on opposite coasts!

      I’m currently in the throes of preparing to present at the Women and Leadership conference at Boise State University. It’s just around the corner (Sept 25-26).

  15. My next activity is to review a book about How To Learn. I was amazed that I learned so much from reading this book and I was able to increase my comprehension when I speed read. The author was learning dis-abled as a child and squeaked into college where a very smart senior student taught him several tricks of the learning trade. This excited the author to work with a team of learning specialists and he has now been able to learn 6 or 7 languages and go from being a C student to an A student . I always want to be learning and this book just upped my strategies. So now I best end here and write this review!! You make a great point with this post.
    Also I noticed a decrease in “senior moments” after working on the exercises in this short book.

  16. Learning to show my gratitude instead of just my displeasure at someone or something. My grade 6 teacher always said, “I give credit where credit is due.” Years ago I added “and discredit where discredit is due.” The former was getting short shrift so now I’m working on it where I see it. Might as well use my big mouth for something positive. I am also continuing to learn my photography with my garden and public gardens, lakes and boats, old buildings, and people.

  17. Welsh poetry, Laurie , that’s what . My neighbour is learning Welsh ( not me , a little too complicated) and has started writing welsh poetry . Well I’m hooked because I write poetry, so we are swapping or masterpieces.
    What fun ! I totally agree we should never ever stop learning , it’s our right as a human .
    Cherryx

  18. Alas at this particular time I am keeping abreast of the vital autumn reasons on the movie scene at the most artful time of the year, and am familiarizing myself with the picture book crop as I move forward with my just launched 2019 Caldecott series, which I decided to stage once again after some indecision due to various other commitments.

    • Oh, Sam — I so wish I could dive into your Caldecott series as I have in seasons past, but as it is I’m wearing water-wings to keep afloat, and the sharks are circling with a looming book-three deadline. My very, very best wishes to you as you share the best in children’s literature with the world.

      • Oh gosh Laurie, I totally and completely understand!!! I could never thank you enough for all you have done for many years in promoting the series. You have gone above and beyond and then above and beyond some more. Wishing you a successful Book #3 launch, I’ll be keeping eye on that. As to my own Caldecott series, this may well be the final year, as it admittedly time consuming to the extreme, and I am nearing retirement from my teaching position, having turned 65 in August. As always I take things a day at a time. Thanks again for all you have done and best wishes on the new release!!!

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