Going the Distance

To get to a large grocery store, a gas station with un-inflated prices, or to pick up a pizza (not from a cafe that incidentally offers pizza), I drive 17 miles to a neighboring town. It boasts a population of 4,348—six times the size of the undisclosed location where I’m enjoying my sabbatical. The drive is gorgeous!

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Hint #11 — Lewis and Clark most likely saw this view when they were blazing a trail through this neck of the woods.

When I arrived with an already-started manuscript, I calculated how many words I’d need to write each day to go the distance; to complete it in three months. It requires 1,000 words per day, not counting Tuesdays, or two short visits from Len when we goof off the entire time.

For many people, writing 1,000 words per day is child’s play. Not for me. Even in a near-hermit existence with solitude as my companion, 1,000 words per day—that aren’t gobbledegook—is quite an undertaking, but I’m going the distance.

What is your most recent “going the distance” experience?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Logging and Writing

Not exclusive to screenplays, many writers create loglines to succinctly answer the question, “What’s your screenplay about?” or “Tell me a little bit about your book.”

Similar to an “elevator pitch,” a logline is a one or two sentence description of the story you want to convey to your audience or readers. For example, here’s the logline for the movie, Titanic:

A young man and woman from different social classes fall in love aboard an ill-fated voyage at sea.

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Hint #10 — Logging is a BIG deal in my undisclosed sabbatical location. In fact, it’s celebrated here!

I’m currently working on the logline for my next book, The Business of Being. Subject to change, here’s what I’ve got so far:

This book isn’t about being in business; it’s about the business of being. Spotlighting the intersection of corporate core values and personal virtues, The Business of Being helps you thrive in business and life.

If your life were a book, what would the logline be?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

The Writers’ Institute

UW Madison by Laurie Buchanan

UW Madison by Laurie Buchanan

For the last several days we’ve been talking about a few of the course offerings at the University of Life. This morning I head to the Writer’s Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where I’ll spend the next four days polishing my craft, pitching my project, and promoting my manuscript.

Why is it, exactly, that writers write? There are as many reasons for writing as there are writers, but the common thread is instinct. Writer’s write because we must; we write because it’s who we are. The same force that moves a musician to set free an enchanting piece of music, or a painter to give birth to a captivating painting, is the one that moves us to unleash the ideas that are whispered in our ears.

The delicate task of selection and arrangement of words on a page—writing—is as vital to us as breathing. For most writers, this requires seclusion; we need our privacy. Like a surgeon with a scalpel, we carefully examine each word; first in the quietness of our mind and then aloud. After that they’re scrutinized again, rearranged once more, and then trimmed to the bone for effectiveness.

At this conference one of the things I’ll be learning is to wield my scalpel more effectively. This includes assignments that are time sensitive. As such, I’ll be offline until the 26th, focusing on the task at hand. When I return I’ll resume blogging on even days of the month.

Listen with your heart,

Laurie Buchanan

Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing.”
               ~ Laurie Buchanan

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