Buddha Bowl

One of the many things I talk with my clients about is how we fuel our body — the physical package we reside in. A Buddha Bowl is one of the daily staples in our home. So in the spirit of health, here’s how it’s done:

Find a unique, large-sized bowl that for you symbolizes nourishment and gratitude. And perhaps a pair of chopsticks to enhance slow eating and mindfulness. Preparing this meal should be enjoyable, relaxing, and creative. As you fill your Buddha Bowl, remember that you’re creating food art.

I found my Buddha Bowl at a resale shop — it’s 10-inches across the top and 3.75 inches deep

I found my Buddha Bowl at a resale shop — it’s 10-inches across the top and 3.75 inches deep

Farm-to-table means little to no processing involved. The closer to the earth we eat, the healthier the food is for us. I’m all about nutritionally dense fuel — foods with a high nutrition-to-calorie ratio. And it goes without saying, buy organic whenever possible and avoid anything that’s genetically modified (GMO).

50% of the Bowl — Greens
Raw organic greens: kale, arugula, watercress, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip greens, collards, romaine lettuce, cabbage (red and green), and a bit of cilantro and/or parsley. Greens are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber. Note: the darker the color, the more nutritionally dense it is.

25% of the Bowl — Vegetables & Fruit
Raw, steamed, or roasted vegetables; mix textures and tastes — crunchy, sweet, bitter, juicy, bland — sprouts (my favorite is alfalfa), asparagus tips, onion, garlic, peppers, mushrooms, broccoli and/or cauliflower florets, Brussels sprouts, carrots, tomatoes, avocado, peas (snow, sugar snap, or English), papaya arils, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, diced fruit; the choices are endless.

25% of the Bowl — Protein
Protein: beans (garbanzo, black, kidney, pinto, lima), cooked lentils and/or quinoa, diced hardboiled eggs, tofu, and/or maybe a bit of brown rice. Did you know that 1 cup of cooked brown rice has 5 grams of protein? Another great source of protein is raw seeds and nuts: walnuts, pumpkin seeds, almonds, hemp seeds, cashews, sunflower seeds, sesame, ground flax seed, pecans, pine nuts, chia seeds.

Dressing the Meal
Like the rest of the bowl, the final touch will vary from meal-to-meal, depending on what you have available:

  • Drizzle your favorite oil — olive, avocado, coconut
  • Splash on balsamic vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice
  • Spice it up with a dash of sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, maybe some cayenne
Eat slowly and savor your meal with gratitude.

Eat slowly and savor your meal with gratitude

A daily food staple in our home is a BUDDHA BOWL salad. What's your recipe for health? Click To Tweet

What’s your recipe for health?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Not Julie Andrews List

With our recent four-day loss of internet connectivity, we came to realize just how important — vital — the internet has become in our daily lives. That “digital detox” provided me with unexpected time to enjoy a few of my favorite things and brought to mind a conversation my friend Kathryn McCullough and I had last fall on her blog, Reinventing the Event Horizon, where I shared with her (cue the music for My Favorite Things from The Sound of Music)

“As you know, I have very few material possessions. My favorites include a sarape/cape I bought in San Miguel de Allende Mexico, a wide-brimmed garden hat my husband bought me in Colorado, and what I lovingly call my Buddha Butt — a small hand-crafted meditation bench. I have a pair of mahogany chopsticks that Len got me in Yokosuka Japan that I use daily, and I have a pair of black pants — high waisted like Katharine Hepburn wore — that have served me well for many years.”

Laurie in Cape 11-2012
What are a few of
your favorite things?

Laurie Buchanan

Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing.” — Laurie Buchanan

The Book — Discovering the Seven Selves
The Experience — Life Harmony

© Laurie Buchanan 2014

Find me on Twitter @HolEssence
Find me on Facebook

Chop Wood, Carry Water

Before enlightenment—chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment—chop wood, carry water.” —Zen Buddhist Proverb

The duties are the same. The need is the same. So what’s the difference? The frame of mind.

The practice of mindfulness—being in the present moment—invites us to focus on the task at hand. When we’re in the moment, everything becomes lighter; we’re not compelled to watch the clock.

When we’re fully present, we discover that work is no longer a burden.
Wood is chopped. Water is carried. Life happens.

At our house, one of our favorite areas to practice mindfulness is eating. Len and I share a middle name—Hoover. We tend to vacuum the food right off our plates!

That is…until we started eating with chopsticks. These wonderful utensils have caused us to slow down. To pause. To reflect.

What's your favorite task to practice mindfulness? Click To Tweet

What’s your favorite task to practice mindfulness?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com