Shouting Doesn’t Help

The road trip to my sabbatical location wasn’t much different from watching “I Love Lucy.”

SCENE: 70 mph, five lanes, one fork, two exits, lots of traffic, freezing rain, and slick road conditions at dusk. Oh, and did I mention the frequent bounding of mule deer across the highway?

LEN says: “There’s a fork in the road up ahead. When you veer right, stay in the left lane because the road we need to take is across from a shopping mall on the right.”

LAURIE shouts: “What?!”

SIRI grumbles: “Recalculating route…” (but I’m sure what followed under her breath was “Ay-Yi-Yi” with a Ricky Ricardo accent) as we missed the turnoff.

Hint #2 — The cat where I’m living during my sabbatical is usually indoor/outdoor. However, because wolves are down from the surrounding mountains hunting for food—one seen as close as the neighbor’s porch—he’s strictly indoor at this time.

“I know that you believe you understand what you think I said, but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.” —Robert McCloskey, American author and illustrator of children’s books

Can you relate?

Reminder, the caveat of the Looking for Laurie game stipulates: “The first person to type the accurate city and state of my sabbatical location into the comments section of the Mar 28 post will receive a personalized copy of Note to Self: A Seven-Step Path to Gratitude and Growth for themselves or as a gift to someone else.”

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

The Hurl Principle

The scientific community has countless laws, theories, and principles:

The law of gravity, The big bang theory, the law of thermodynamics, Hubble’s law of cosmic expansion, Kepler’s three laws of planetary expansion, Archimedes’ buoyancy principle, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity, to name but a few.

Clearly, one of the most common principles has never been recognized, let alone named. Yet it’s evidenced in thousands of households across the globe — daily. And I’m here to lay claim to fame by pointing it out and naming it — The Hurl Principle.

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury (readers), based on evidence I submit below, and with substantiation from your very own households, you can attest to whether or not this principle does, indeed, exist:

Exhibit A
With the exception of two small rugs, our home — like many of yours — has smooth, hard surface floors throughout.

Exhibit B
Be it K9 or feline, a book can not be judged by it’s cover (don’t be sucked in by her regal, yet innocent expression)…

When said K9‘s and/or felines feel like they’re going to toss their cookies, vomit their vittles, or hork their hash — they immediately evacuate all smooth surfaces and without fail, lose their lunch on the closest rug or carpeted surface they can find.

With hundreds of easy-to-clean square feet at their beck and call, they rush to a rug — evan a postage-stamp sized rug will suffice — and belch in braille, chortle their chunks, hork their hooey!

Do you have a companion animal who supports this scientific principle?

Laurie Buchanan

Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing.” — Laurie Buchanan

The Book — Discovering the Seven Selves
The Experience — Life Harmony

© Laurie Buchanan 2014

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The Paws that Refreshes

The Paws that Refreshes by Laurie Buchanan

The Paws that Refreshes by Laurie Buchanan

Even if we don’t drink it, we all remember Coca-Cola’s slogan: “The Pause that Refreshes.”

Time and time again scientific studies have shown that companion animals have a positive affect on human health:

Physically challenged individuals indicate that their service dogs provide companionship and support, reduce stress, increase their “freedom to be capable,” and provide a sense of purpose.

Quality of life improves in families of epileptic individuals when a dog that responds to seizures is present in the home.

Animal-assisted therapy effectively reduces the loneliness of residents in long-term care facilities.

One general study found that cat owners scored better on psychological health ratings than did non-owners. Other studies have been more specific, focusing on groups facing stressful life events such as bereavement, illness, and homelessness. Findings from these studies often indicate that pets—dogs, cats, and birds—play a significant supportive role, reducing depression and loneliness and providing companionship and a need for responsibility.

Even passive interaction with animals can provide benefit. For example, people who watch fish in an aquarium experience decreased pulse rate, increased skin temperature, and decreased muscle tension. Amazingly, the nutritional intake and weight of Alzheimer’s Disease patients increased significantly when fish aquariums were introduced into their dining areas.

Companion animals—truly the paws that refreshes.

Do you have a companion animal? If not now, perhaps one in the past?

Listen with your heart,

Laurie Buchanan

Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing.”
               — Laurie Buchanan

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© 2011 Laurie Buchanan – All Rights Reserved