All Things Great and Small

In the United States, we celebrate Thanksgiving this coming Thursday, Nov 22nd. But we don’t have to wait for a special occasion to express gratitude. 

And though we live over a thousand miles apart, my sister and I share a practice. Each day before we rise we express thanks for all things—great and small—in our lives.

Evan, Luna Bleue, Kayley

“There is no foot too small that it cannot leave an imprint on this world.” —Unknown

I’m grateful for family, especially the newest little bud on our family tree.

What are you grateful for?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Hope and Upliftment

While we were in the labor and delivery waiting room of St. Luke’s hospital in early October, waiting for the arrival of our granddaughter, we walked the halls and admired the incredible work of professional photographer, Brianna Chaves of BC Photography.

And while we were in the main newborn waiting room, we learned that there is another waiting room—the neonatal intensive care waiting room for families whose loved one has given or is giving birth to a significantly premature baby. 

The cool thing about the hallway leading to that special waiting room is that it’s lined with photographs of current-day children—ranging in age from five to twelve—who are holding pictures of themselves as premies. The purpose is to provide upliftment and give hope to those in the special area.

The thoughtfulness of each photo made me cry—happy tears. 

When was the last time you cried tears of joy?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Bursting with Joy

Our first grandchild arrived last week, and our hearts are bursting with joy! This photograph is of our son holding his newborn daughter, Luna Bleue. 

Watching my child fall in love with his child… priceless. 

As a holistic health practitioner and doula, I’ve had the privilege of attending many births. It doesn’t matter how many times, or in what capacity I get to be part of the birth process, it never ceases to amaze me. 

When was the last time you fell in love?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Blue Moon

Remember in last week’s post I shared a few of the things I did while on the first leg of my book tour in the San Diego area? Well, there was one more thing. But first, let me set the stage:

  • I’m going to be a first-time grandparent at the end of this month. 
  • We know the baby is a girl. 
  • We know that her name is going to be Luna Bleue.

That said, I wanted to do something to honor the momentous occasion, so I had this artwork done:

Ink Wisdom
“A good tattoo isn’t cheap and a cheap tattoo isn’t good.” 

I’d done my homework in advance and went to EvenTide Tattoo in Cardiff by the Sea— the best of the best in the area. 

Do you have a tattoo?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

DNA Blueprint

Boise, Idaho has a fantastic downtown area with a plethora of incredible signage. One of my favorites is this one for the Idaho Blueprint and Supply Co. I love that it’s three-dimensional, that it doesn’t lay flat against the building.

Every time I pass this sign I think of my blueprint, my DNA. The dictionary defines DNA as follows:

“DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is like a blueprint of biological guidelines that a living organism must follow to exist and remain functional.”

“We’ve been led to believe that the goal of equality is to somehow make differences disappear yet, in reality, it is to be profoundly aware of them and to recognize them as beautiful and valuable and necessary. The virtue is not in ignoring our various distinctions, but in celebrating them; not in pretending as though they don’t exist, but in believing that their existence makes us a better version of humanity as we live together in community.” —JOHN PAVLOVITZ, from his book “A Bigger Table: Building Messy, Authentic, and Hopeful Spiritual Community”

Have you ever had your DNA tested to discover the breakdown of your ancestry?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Optical Illusion

We took our son out to dinner for his birthday, and after a delicious meal, we asked the waiter if he would take our photograph with my cell phone. When we dropped Evan off at his apartment, he said, “Will you please send me a copy of that photo?” As we pulled away, I sent it to him.

Before we arrived at our house—only a mile away—my cell phone rang. “Mom, did you see the optical illusion?” I had no idea what he was talking about. “Open the photo and look at the straw on the table. It looks like the right side of it is levitating.”

Sure enough!

You’ve heard the saying, “Don’t believe everything you think.” Well, don’t believe everything you see, either.

What was your most recent encounter with an illusion?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com

Rock On!

Cairns—we saw them aplenty when we climbed Ben Nevis. We noticed quite a few in Nova Scotia. We spotted them as trail markers in John Muir woods, on Palomar Mountain near the observatory, and now in the shallows of the Boise river—in this case, parents built them symbolically, one cairn each for a family of seven.

Used by people around the globe, cairns — human-made stack of stones — serve many different purposes:

  • Utilitarian: to mark a path, territory, or specific site
  • Spiritual: inviting passersby to stop and reflect
  • Ceremonial: when placed within a circle of enclosing stones
  • Memorial: when friends and family members voice a fond remembrance of a loved one while adding adding a stone
  • Symbolic: the uses are endless including love, prayer, and artistic expression

Have you ever built a cairn?

© TuesdaysWithLaurie.com